You are:

News

Return to news listings

TSSA call for Transport minister to intervene in Irish Rail pay talks

28 September 2017

TSSA are calling for Transport Minister Ross to intervene to prevent strike action after years of underfunding of rail in Ireland.

All rail services in Ireland including the DART service will come to a halt if Iarnrod Eireann can’t come to a deal. With the bank holiday at the end of October looming, the onus is on the government to intervene.

Pay talks have collapsed at the Workplace Relations Commission. TSSA is bitterly disappointed that the company has not stepped up to the plate to deliver a fair and reasonable pay offer.

TSSA Irish Organiser Patrick McCusker said

‘I’m happy to negotiate on behalf of our members, but after 12 hours it was clear the company wasn’t genuinely trying to engage with us, their offer was insulting.

‘After nearly a decade of a pay freeze the company are now saying workers have to fund their own pay rise by agreeing to an attack on terms and conditions and job security. That is totally unacceptable.’

 The company offer of 1.5% per year with strings attached can only be described as “derisory”.

 

TSSA leader Manuel Cortes said:

 ‘It’s time for the Minister to come out of hiding and do his job. Shane Ross needs to stop spectating and start getting involved.’

 The trade unions had asked for a no strings attached pay increase of 3.75% which keeps us in line with the sister company at Dublin Bus and reflects the current transport sector pay increase that are around 2.75%-3%.

 All TSSA members in management, clerical, supervisory and professional & technical grades are affected by any industrial action.

 The 1.5% pay offer was conditional on the trade unions accepting such things as outsourcing of work, forced redeployment, an increment freeze, closing of booking offices, line closures and a reduction in contracted hours. 

 

The trade unions will meet to coordinate actions in the next couple of days.

 

Return to news listings

Join TSSA

 

 

Directory