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Going Beyond Blog of Learning Opportunities

This blog is a place to share the learning opportunities through Going Beyond, our Communities of Practice education programme.  You can request to join a Community of Practice here: www.tssa.org.uk/goingbeyond

 Displaying posts 1 - 6 of 6

  • Challenge Bullying 2020

    Author: Nadine RaePosted: 13 November 2020

    In May 2020, TSSA launched our Addressing Bullying and Harassment Community of Practice as part of our new education initiative, Going Beyond. Since then we have had several events and discussions to explore what causes bullying and harassment and in what ways can we change our workplace culture to make them more inclusive.16-20 november is Anti-Bullying Week part of our community of practice learning we are holding our first ever TSSA Challenge Bullying Conference. This is an online event to delve even deeper into how we can address bullying and harassment. Click Read More to find out what we will discuss in Challenge Bullying 2020...

    Over the year some questions have led our spiral of learning on this theme, thinking about how we address bullying and harassment at work. Here are just some:

    ‘What would a bully-free workplace look like?’

    The opposite of a bullying culture is not the absence of bullying, but in fact a culture that when described, is inclusion, empathy, kindness, connection. Those elements need to be lived through our organising and the approach to this issue, as they need to be modelled to be embedded in the workplace.

    ‘Who has examples of best practice that we can learn from?’

    Unfortunately, I don’t think anyone can say they are a model of best practice, as no one has yet eliminated bullying and harassing behaviours from their organisations. It seems more realistic at this moment in time to think about the journey we are going on, acting and reflecting on what is working, what is not, and building towards an inclusive workplace. There is still a lot to understand in terms of why people bully, what enables these behaviours and therefore what practical things can an organisation and individuals do to stop it.

    If the opposite of a bullying culture is inclusion, empathy, kindness and connection, then

    ‘What are we doing to make our workplaces more inclusive?’

    I spoke to Loraine Martins, Director of Diversity & Inclusion at Network Rail this week, who said clearly that we are all ambassadors for the good and not so good in our industry; that our work on inclusion runs parallel to any work we can do to address bullying and harassment in the workplace. Loraine spoke to me of the need to be consistent, develop trust so that people are confident to speak up about their experiences or intervene when they observe bullying and harassing behaviours. The challenge she said, is to reach that level of consistency.

    ‘Is our approach to addressing bullying and harassment critical in the outcome, or does it just matter that it ends?’

    This is a question that pops into my head when the catch phrase ‘Zero Tolerance’ is said, not because the sentiment is not right, but because fighting might with might, doesn’t quite feel right to me. Many people use that term and for good reasons. Whilst potentially a controversial opinion, Zero Tolerance is not a phrase I would naturally associate with inclusion, empathy, kindness and connection, even though bullying behaviours should not be tolerated. Language plays a strong part in creating an inclusive environment and culture. Shouldn’t we reflect on the language and behaviours we want everyone to adopt, and ensure our way of addressing bullying includes that language and behaviour and reinforces that new culture?

    Jon Everest of Victoria University of Wellington in Aotearoa New Zealand is an expert in Restorative Practice. He shared with me his thoughts on how the language of the justice system does not translate well into the workplace. Concepts of perpetrators or offenders and victims, can only lend itself to people seeking to defend themselves, not reflect on their behaviours and acknowledge their part in the process, and change. Similarly, the mechanisms of investigation, disciplinaries and grievances identify only two people affected, the bully and the victim, and simply seeks to identify what rule they have broken and how they can be punished. In reality, Jon suggests their colleagues are often aware of what is going on and when the investigation ends, there is still residual harm done to the entire workplace that is usually not addressed at all. Neither is there always exploration of what an organisation can do to prevent it from happening again. While there is a place for formal processes, if we are to truly address bullying and harassment, we need to go beyond our current approach and understanding of injustice and seek to restore the workplace relationships between all people affected, following any harm that has occurred.

    We will hear more form Loraine Martins and Jon Everest at our Challenge Bullying event and explore the concepts of Restorative Practice, Diversity and Inclusion in more detail in our Community of Practice throughout 2021 and beyond.

    Challenge Bullying as an event has resonated with many members. We have had more applications for this than any education event in the past ten years. For some of those who will attend, it is because they are facing this issue in the workplace right now. For others, they want to know how to support colleagues or make a difference in their workplace. Either way, it is clear the work of our TSSA Addressing Bullying and Harassment Community of Practice in 2021 will be extremely important to changing member’s lives for the better. Challenge Bullying is not simply what we need to do, but a challenge we set ourselves to change workplace culture, not simply get better at what we are currently doing as it is not going to create the difference our members want.

    TSSA will continue to lead on addressing bullying and harassment through building our community of practice and applying our learning to our work changing lives. If you want to be part of our CoP you can request to join here: www.tssa.org.uk/goingbeyond

    Nadine Rae

    TSSA Organising Director

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  • Going Beyond for Racial Equality

    Author: Nadine RaePosted: 30 October 2020

    Going Beyond for Racial Equality - TSSA's New Community of Practice

    October was Black History Month and I am pleased that TSSA has been active and focussed on bringing people together around issues of race in the workplace. In response to our members who are BAME and who wish to support BAME colleagues, we have established our Going Beyond for Racial Equality Community of Practice, to explore what we can do as a union to improve equality, diversity and inclusion for BAME people in our workplaces. Click 'Read More'...

    Over the past two years we have worked to build an active BAME network and really explore the lived experiences of our members who are from black, asian and minority ethnicity communities. Unfortunately for some members, those experiences have included casual and blatant racism, subtle micro-aggressions and experiences that make workplaces feel unsafe, unsupportive and in some cases hostile. The impact on people facing this kind of environment each day, is extremely damaging to mental health, self-esteem and their ability to perform and contribute at work. In some cases, safety can be compromised, where bias and prejudice clouds the decision making and reactions of people in safety critical roles and roles that manage other people. During the covid pandemic, safety for BAME people has been a significant concern. Our BAME members who are key workers have raised concerns about their exposure to Covid-19 through their job roles and we have worked tirelessly with employers and government to ensure they and others are safe. In times when you know you are at a higher risk than other people, you need to also feel confident your concerns are being heard and will be addressed, and that you are safe at work. More than ever TSSA is needed by BAME workers in transport and travel.

    We also have other members who have been moved by local and global events this year and want to know what they can do to end racism and support BAME colleagues. Our work building the Inclusive Rail campaign for LGBT+ people has made it clear that allyship is essential for changing negative culture and making our workplaces inclusive. We encourage anyone who wants to be an ally for BAME people to get involved in our community of practice. Our BAME members want to have the same opportunities to contribute and progress in their careers that other people experience and we all can help that become a reality.

    Going Beyond for Racial Equality is a community of practice that will help all TSSA members and supporters talk about race, about prejudice, about privilege, about equality and find practical ways we can bring about change and make our workplaces inclusive of BAME people. You can request to be part of the community of practice here: www.tssa.org.uk/goingbeyond.

    Nadine Rae

    TSSA Organising Director

     

    If you have any about your safety at work due to covid-19 visit www.tssa.org.uk/safeatwork or contact our helpdesk helpdesk@tssa.org.uk

     

     

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  • Unconscious Bias Blog - Archetypes

    Author: Andrew HollingsworthPosted: 16 June 2020

    In my last blog I introduced you to Jung’s Archetypes and in this blog, I wanted to explore a specific archetype to see if there could be some of the UB patterns hidden within it and to explore whether there are some deeper underlying reasons for the UB’s. Click read more to carry on reading 

    The Rebel/Destroyer Archetype has a terrifying name that can easily be misunderstood based on the biases that spring to mind but there is a lot more to this ancient pattern than the label suggests!

    The Rebel/Destroyer is a paradoxical aspect of our psyche and as with all extremes can produce extreme results and outcomes. The goal of the Rebel/Destroyer is metamorphosis - not just change... It is driving by the need to revolutionise and transform things that are either not functioning properly or not the way they think it should. A positive outcome to this can be the ability to ‘weed the garden’ - when done appropriately, creating amazing opportunities for growth and innovation. The Rebel/Destroyers ability to troubleshoot and game-change is a powerful tool in the hands of a balanced Rebel/Destroyer.

    By contrast, when our Rebel/Destroyer isn’t in balance it can produce destructive behaviours in self and others. Radical views and repressed anger can lead them to break the rules and ruthlessly pursue their interests labelling those who don’t share their drive as weak and useless.

    If, as Jung suggests, we all have this Archetype within us operating either unconsciously or (now) more consciously, how could this form some of our UB?

    The pioneering French Psychologist Pierre Janet, regarding as one of the founding fathers of modern psychology, suggested that ‘there is a certain weakness of consciousness which is unable to hold all the psyche processes together’ – in other words the unconscious is in conflict with our conscious and as a result doesn’t necessarily harmonise in a balanced way.

    Maybe this is a driver for UB, those unconscious elements being driven by our Archetypes struggle to actualise as a result of the conflict? Maybe the Rebel/Destroyers need to bring revolutionary change is misunderstood and regarded as reckless and conflictual by conscious self or others?

    Maybe through this inner conflict our UB can be explored, harmonised and rectified in a balanced way?

    Another avenue to consider is Jung’s view on the ‘the Shadow’; our Shadow representing the supressed, hidden aspects of the psyche that we don’t appreciate. Many times, our UB will be expressed and projected onto other people via the activities of the Shadow.

    How often do we hear someone (normally ourselves if we’re honest) talking about a character trait or behaviour that we don’t like in someone else?

    “They’re selfish, they’re stingy, they’re liars...” etc etc. which is then normally followed by the expression “I can’t stand people like that...” Ouch...

    I would suggest in a significant amount of cases, the person projecting from the Shadow isn’t even aware it’s their Shadow and with little or no awareness of where this trait or behaviour is coming from.

    In the cases of those who probably do have a good idea, what they’re really saying is something along the lines of “I don’t like that trait in me but rather than face into it and deal with it, I’ll blame other people”

    I’ve shared with you one of the twelve core Archetypes which Jung regarded as personality complexes within themselves and how the struggle between the conscious and unconscious can result in traits and behaviours that we struggle to deal with.

    Maybe the quest to understand UB will unfold the more we explore and face into them with openness, honesty, patience and a lot of humility!

     Andy Hollingsworth

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  • More on Archetypes and Unconscious Bias

    Author: Andrew HollingsworthPosted: 04 June 2020

    In my last blog I introduced you to Jung’s Archetypes and in this blog, I wanted to explore a specific archetype to see if there could be some of the Unconscious Bias (UB) patterns hidden within it and to explore whether there are some deeper underlying reasons for the UB’s. The Rebel/Destroyer Archetype has a terrifying name that can easily be misunderstood based on the biases that spring to mind but there is a lot more to this ancient pattern than the label suggests! Read on to explore further...

    The Rebel/Destroyer is a paradoxical aspect of our psyche and as with all extremes can produce extreme results and outcomes. The goal of the Rebel/Destroyer is metamorphosis - not just change... It is driving by the need to revolutionise and transform things that are either not functioning properly or not the way they think it should. A positive outcome to this can be the ability to ‘weed the garden’ - when done appropriately, this creates amazing opportunities for growth and innovation. The Rebel/Destroyers ability to troubleshoot and game-change is a powerful tool in the hands of a balanced Rebel/Destroyer.

    By contrast, when our Rebel/Destroyer isn’t in balance it can produce destructive behaviours in self and others. Radical views and repressed anger can lead them to break the rules and ruthlessly pursue their interests labelling those who don’t share their drive as weak and useless. If, as Jung suggests, we all have this Archetype within us operating either unconsciously or (now) more consciously, how could this form some of our UB?

    The pioneering French Psychologist Pierre Janet, regarding as one of the founding fathers of modern psychology, suggested that ‘there is a certain weakness of consciousness which is unable to hold all the psyche processes together’ – in other words the unconscious is in conflict with our conscious and as a result doesn’t necessarily harmonise in a balanced way.
    Maybe this is a driver for UB, those unconscious elements being driven by our Archetypes struggle to actualise as a result of the conflict? Maybe the Rebel/Destroyers need to bring revolutionary change is misunderstood and regarded as reckless and conflictual by conscious self or others? Maybe through this inner conflict our UB can be explored, harmonised and rectified in a balanced way?

    Another avenue to consider is Jung’s view on the ‘the Shadow’; our Shadow representing the supressed, hidden aspects of the psyche that we don’t appreciate. Many times, our UB will be expressed and projected onto other people via the activities of the Shadow. How often do we hear someone (normally ourselves if we’re honest) talking about a character trait or behaviour that we don’t like in someone else? “They’re selfish, they’re stingy, they’re liars...” etc etc. which is then normally followed by the expression “I can’t stand people like that...” Ouch...

    I would suggest in a significant amount of cases, the person projecting from the Shadow isn’t even aware it’s their Shadow and with little or no awareness of where this trait or behaviour is coming from. In the cases of those who probably do have a good idea, what they’re really saying is something along the lines of “I don’t like that trait in me but rather than face into it and deal with it, I’ll blame other people”

    I’ve shared with you one of the twelve core Archetypes which Jung regarded as personality complexes within themselves and how the struggle between the conscious and unconscious can result in traits and behaviours that we struggle to deal with. Maybe the quest to understand UB will unfold the more we explore and face into them with openness, honesty, patience and a lot of humility!

    Andy Hollingsworth

     

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  • Unconscious Bias - Let's stop and think

    Author: Laurence HarveyPosted: 02 June 2020

    Laurence Harvey pic‘How could they do that’? Have you ever said this to yourself? The question is, could anyone be saying this about you? Have you ever been driving (or being driven) and suddenly the driver ‘loses it’? Has it been you that has ever lost it? It could be little things. The driver in front on the roundabout suddenly veers off to the right in front of you. The thing is, if you think about it, you knew something was going to happen. You had a ‘gut feeling’ something wasn’t right with the car in front. Your ‘intuition’ was telling you to be aware of what might happen. Did you listen to your gut, your intuition? Or did you carry on and then lose it? Suddenly your behaviour changes. Shouting, screaming, swearing at the vehicle in front. Pointing, gesturing, banging and bashing your hooter! Keep reading to see how our momentary distress can affect our judgement and what that might mean in the workplace...

    You would never do what they did, would you? It was someone else’s fault, wasn’t it?

    It’s never us, it’s always someone else.

    Have you ever been lost on unfamiliar territory? Have you ever had to veer to the right at the last minute? Have you?

    Do you think they meant to upset you? Or did you allow the situation to upset you. The emotions kicked in and it affected your behaviour, in a split second. You were momentarily out of control. Not conscious of what you were saying or doing. It happens. Or, the question is, do you allow it to happen?

    Let’s stop and think. Let’s be honest with ourselves. What might you be doing, that you actually don’t mean to do? If you are not aware of what you are thinking, you may not always be aware of what you are saying or doing.

    At work do we have a ‘gut feeling’ that something isn’t right for someone. Is our intuition telling us that something is awry for them? Can we stop and think and be conscious of the fact that it might be what you are doing that is affecting them?

    Has the conversation and comments at work ever veered of into the world of ‘banter’. Is it then that you (and others) get the feeling ‘I know where this is going?’ Where do you go?

    Then there are certain jokes that only happen at certain times, when certain people are, or are not around. Do you laugh and join in to ‘fit in’? Or do you consciously decide to stay quiet and not laugh at something you really do not find funny?

    Human beings tend to be good at judging others behaviours and reacting to them. But how good are we at being conscious of how what we are doing may be perceived by others as bullying and/or harassment. Do you mean anyone to feel that way?

    Next time you get the feeling that something isn’t right, stop and think and be sure that it is not you that is the cause of it. Don’t let it be your fault.

    Let’s manage our emotional reactions and be more tolerant of others.

    Let’s consciously manage the little things that happen to us. Let’s not blame anyone. Let’s use our ‘common sense’.

    Let’s make the way that we behave be the right way. ‘Behaviour breeds behaviour’. If we could all behave more patiently with everybody all of the time how much better may we all feel?

    Laurence Harvey was Guest Expert for our Exploring Unconscious Bias event held on 19th May 2020. To explore unconscious bias some more and discuss the event, request to join our Community of Practive Discussion on 1100-1230 10th June.

    Find out more about it here: www.tssa.org.uk/en/Your-union/education/education-events.cfm/CoP%20Discussion%20Exploring%20Unconscious%20Bias 

     

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  • The six needs and how they relate to bullying behaviours

    Author: Nadine RaePosted: 01 June 2020

     Six needs activity - Gabija Toleikyte Many of you may have heard of the six psychological human needs. Guest Expert Prof. Gabija Toleikyte shares with you in the video below just how our six needs influence our behaviours. This understanding will give us insight into the origin of some of the negative behaviours driving bullying and harassment. Our event this week will go into this in more detail and explore the affects on people who are affected by bullying and harassment in the workplace. Watch the video in the link below and request to attend the event here: www.tssa.org.uk/onlineeventrequest

    Six needs - Gabija Toleikyte

    Video: Six needs by Gabija Toleikyte

    As part of your preparation for this session you can:

    1. watch the video The Six Needs, by Prof. Gabija Toleikyte
    2. think about where you are at with each of your six needs
    3. ask to join our Going Beyond LinkedIn group and find out more from Prof. Gabija Toleikyte on the Neuroscience of Bullying www.linkedin.com/groups/8926754/

    I hope you enjoy the session!


    Nadine Rae
    TSSA Organising Director

     

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